All GRIDS share the concept of shifting one or more embellishment across different partials of a rhythm or rudiment. There are thousands of formulas and combinations utilizing this concept that help supplement drummers seeking to develop accuracy, fluidity, and rhythmic comprehension.


A 4-2-1 duplet grid could implement single stroke sixteenth notes with a shifting accent as the moving pattern:

1. )  Play each variation four times.

2. )  Play each variation two times.

3. )  Repeat step 2.

4. )  Play each variation one time.

5. )  Repeat step 4.

A.)  First Variation - Accent falls on the downbeat (the first partial or sixteenth note).

B.)  Second Variation - Accent shifts to the right (or the "e" of the beat).

C.)  Third Variation - Accent shifts to the next sixteenth note (or the "&" of the beat).

D.)  Final Variation - Accent shifts to the last sixteenth note (or the "a" of the beat).


Another approach to the grid is to apply a moving pattern with two or more consecutive embellishments.

To determine if the moving pattern’s embellishments are consecutive, look at the beginning of each variation of the sequence. If all the measures within each variation place the embellishments on the same partials, then the embellishments are not consecutive.

If, however, the first measure differs from the following measures within any of the variations, then this should be a dead give away that the moving pattern’s embellishments are consecutive.